Your dream car is parked in out of the elements, but it's not secure because the garage door won't lock. Most garage doors have two horizontal bars that move out from the center of the door into slots along the side of the door in the door track, effectively locking the door in place. Over time, these bars can shift slightly out of position so that they are no longer correctly aligned with the locking slots. To realign the bars, unscrew the guide brackets on the edges of the door so that they are loose enough to move, and then reposition them so that they smoothly guide the locking bars into the locking slots. Lubricate the lock mechanism with machine oil and you're done.
Are the tracks themselves properly aligned? Vertical tracks should be perfectly straight and the same height as one another. Horizontal ones should slant down slightly toward the back of the garage. To set them in proper alignment: loosen - don't remove - bolts and screws for each mounting bracket. Tap the tracks back into proper position. Re-tighten the bolts and screws. Once you've got the tracks aligned properly, take the time to get rid of whatever hardened grease or dirt has built up inside them or on the rollers with a concentrated household cleaner. Be sure to wipe both rollers and tracks dry after cleaning.

Step 5: Check for loose hardware, and tighten as needed. On swing-up doors, check the plates where the spring is mounted to be sure the screws are tight, and tighten any loose screws. On roll-up doors, check the hinges that hold the sections of the door together; tighten any loose screws, and replace any damaged hinges. Sagging at one side of the door can often be corrected by servicing the hinges. If a screw hole is enlarged, replace the screw with a longer one of the same diameter, and use a hollow fiber plug, dipped in carpenters' glue, with the new screw. If the wood is cracked at a hinge, remove the hinge and fill the cracks and the screw holes with wood filler. Let the filler dry and then replace the hinge. If possible, move the hinge onto solid wood.


Step 5: Check for loose hardware, and tighten as needed. On swing-up doors, check the plates where the spring is mounted to be sure the screws are tight, and tighten any loose screws. On roll-up doors, check the hinges that hold the sections of the door together; tighten any loose screws, and replace any damaged hinges. Sagging at one side of the door can often be corrected by servicing the hinges. If a screw hole is enlarged, replace the screw with a longer one of the same diameter, and use a hollow fiber plug, dipped in carpenters' glue, with the new screw. If the wood is cracked at a hinge, remove the hinge and fill the cracks and the screw holes with wood filler. Let the filler dry and then replace the hinge. If possible, move the hinge onto solid wood.
I'm not a professional, but I watched as my garage doors were serviced last year. The tech used a spray lubricant (I had bought a different brand in the garage door section of a home improvement store). He sprayed the inside of the entire track, top and bottom, the rollers that ride along the track, and all hinges on the door. He sprayed each hinge twice -- once on each side. The techs were more generous with the lubricant than I was when I'd done it before, so don't be afraid to give it a good squirt.

Garage Door Opener

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